Prices including VAT are for UK and EU customers. Prices excluding VAT are for everywhere else. Please note that separate orders cannot be combined into one order.

Julius Caesar - my favourites from this update

by Countess Ablaze February 13, 2014

I thought that it was about time I had a little run down of my favourites from the update. Most of them flew off the shelves very quickly but a small number are still available in the shop.  Anything left from the Julius Caesar update will be taken down on the morning of Friday 28th February as it will be time for the Augustus update in the evening.

It's probably crass but lets start with death. "Why, this is violence!" is what Suetonius claims Julius exclaimed as realised he was to be assassinated by a group of Roman senators, led by Brutus and Longinus. Personally I like to think that if I happened to be in the same situation, I wouldn't be so classy about it and would insert a few expletives in there, but Julius decided to be quite restrained. Kudos. The yarn version is sold out but there's a custom blend fibre still in stock.

Why, this is violence

 

Another death related colourway was also in my favourite list, "You, too, my child?" Suetonius claims that Julius said this to Brutus in Greek, his last words. Julius and Brutus' mother had a bit of a thing going on when they were younger and there was a little speculation that Brutus was his son. Could Julius have said this to confirm the suspicions or was it just a term of endearment? It's widely known that Julius' last words were "Et tu, Brute?" but believe it or not, this is from the play "Julius Caesar" by Billy Shakes and Suetonius writes no such thing. Again, the yarn has sold out but there's a little fibre left.

You, too, my child?

 

"The most flagrant bribery" is what Suetonius describes Julius Caesar did to get into power, he bought his way up the greasy pole of the Roman Republic and became dictator. The yarn is still available on camel silk lace.

The most flagrant bribery

 

Julius had a reputation of being a ladies man and if the rumours were true, he apparently enjoyed the company of Nicomedes, king of Bithynia. Seeing as though his reputation for sexual enjoyment both at home and abroad (yes Cleopatra, I'm looking at you), then the running joke in the capital was "Romans, lock up your wives!" The yarn is available on BFL/Masham DK (I'm biased but this is my favourite yarn base ever made).

Romans, lock up your wives!

Enroute to Rhodes to emerge himself in learning, he was captured by pirates "to his intense annoyance" so what is a guy to do? Well he decided to befriend them, play games, recite a bit of poetry and have a bit of a laugh. So what did he do once the ransom was paid? He had them crucified.

To his intense annoyance




Countess Ablaze
Countess Ablaze

Author